Streaming....is it the future for consoles? - http://www.mmcafe.com/ Forums


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neo0r0chiaku
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"Streaming....is it the future for consoles?" , posted Mon 6 Jan 11:36post reply

Will physical copies of games cease to exist this decade? Will people not be able to collect video games anymore? Will we have to purchase the same digital games for each console release? Will we not be able to resale digital copies of games (used digital copies??) Will consoles only stream games and not have digital copies? Will we not own any games at all? How do you feel the future of gaming will be.

What do you believe will happen to the future of the gaming industry.

Also, I read a article that somewhere in Europe, STEAM users are able to resale there purchase digital download games. Which, I think is good. Why have it there when you can sell it? It wont happen here I presume.





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"Re(1):Streaming....is it the future for conso" , posted Mon 6 Jan 13:04post reply

Given how dedicated Google was to making sure that absolutely no one could ever have use for a Stadia, I figure streaming has faced a bit of a setback. And why bother spending the extra resources on your company's side to host the game when you can just make everyone else download huge files onto their computers like the current situation?





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"Re(2):Streaming....is it the future for conso" , posted Mon 6 Jan 23:48post reply

Streaming is a terrible idea for everyone involved so it's probably the future.

Honestly, while I think the market will continue to move towards digital games through its own volition I don't see something like streaming taking off in the foreseeable future. Yes, it can (sort of) be done, but there are too many downsides and no real benefits. Outside of the people who love new technology simply for its own sake and Google's need to flit away its money there's no real interest in streaming. Unless the infrastructure of the internet changes for a good chunk of the world -and possibly change to laws of physics to get rid of the lag- streaming games seems like a dead end where it is theoretically possible but no demand.







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"Re(1):Streaming....is it the future for conso" , posted Tue 7 Jan 00:48post reply

Stadia is the glorious trashfire that keeps on burning, so the answer now and for the foreseeable future is a clear no.

As for the physical vs. digital debate, people love collecting and digital has too many legal hiccups for preservation and reselling purposes, so physical will continue to have a place in the market, especially if there's enough demand for a certain title.





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"Re(2):Streaming....is it the future for conso" , posted Tue 7 Jan 00:53post reply

I'm still laughing at the promised "negative latency" never delivered by Google (obviously).







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"Re(3):Streaming....is it the future for conso" , posted Tue 7 Jan 01:42post reply

quote:
I'm still laughing at the promised "negative latency" never delivered by Google (obviously).



From what it sounded like, Google was mostly just promising the predictive lag compensation that online games have been implementing to varying degrees for decades, just with the buzzword of "machine learning" thrown in. It might could help with games that were designed to be played offline, but I'd question how useful it would be for online games that already had their own internal compensations.







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"Re(3):Streaming....is it the future for conso" , posted Tue 7 Jan 06:51post reply

Dicey Dungeon is 800 Mo of data. Download it and play it forever.
1 hour of Stadia is 20 Go of data.
And Dicey Dungeon is turn by turn. Then, factor latency.







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"Re(1):Streaming....is it the future for conso" , posted Tue 7 Jan 07:18post reply

quote:
video games anymore?



I played Stadia through a friend that loves getting new technology stuff. It was better than I thought, but I wouldn't play anything online multiplayer on it.

Americas internet providers have 0 incentive to get better. I think it's adorable that companies that push game streaming services think that garbage speeds and data caps don't exist.

Google shoulda been more honest and flat out advertise this as a beta test. "Help us develop the future of gaming by paying us money to test this unfinished mess!" All the presentations to try to get people to buy this have been weird and nonsensical.

This is bad and pointless just get a switch and a console/pc.

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"Re(2):Streaming....is it the future for conso" , posted Tue 7 Jan 08:01post reply

quote:
Americas internet providers have 0 incentive to get better. I think it's adorable that companies that push game streaming services think that garbage speeds and data caps don't exist.


Worse is that Google really should know better. Google entered the US ISP market itself nearly ten years ago with Google Fiber, though they arguably all but abandoned the effort five years later.

Still, Google execs seem to have taken away all the wrong lessons through rose-colored glasses. In defending Stadia's requirements, Google cited how US ISPs improved service to meet user demands. Google seemingly missed that said "improved performance" came in larger urban areas where there was viable competition. Google also seemed to forget that one of the first responses US ISPs have to viable competition is to attempt to block said competition through a combination of lawsuits and proposed legislation. (And yes, Google Fiber itself was on the receiving end of such tactics.)





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"Re(3):Streaming....is it the future for conso" , posted Tue 7 Jan 09:39post reply

How about Geforce Now? I've been using it about a year and think it's the bee's knees. I get to stream the games that I already own instead of having to pay again. When I visit my brother's house, I have access to my whole library on his Shield TV. Any games that aren't offered on the service, I just stream from my PC instead. Between that and the Switch, I can really game anywhere these days.





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"Re(2):32X....is it the future for consoles?" , posted Tue 7 Jan 12:09post reply

quote:
I'm going to snitch on the nebuchadnezzar crew so I can eat steak and live in a mansion full of dogs.

JUAN

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Agent Smith: ...I would rather spend the rest of my life with access only to 32X and the Atari Lynx than attempt to play Stadia on 90% of America's shitty internet.





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"Re(3):32X....is it the future for consoles?" , posted Sun 12 Jan 14:24post reply

I think for playing games on PC/console, Stadia is just not going to work in the USA. For the price of Stadia, you could buy a console, maybe get a Gamepass, and then you get to play games on the console that are running stably locally and all of that would probably cost less than Stadia.

Part of me wants to think it might have more of a future in the USA even taking in account the data limits on mobile in the USA, but then I remember how comically difficult it is to get people to pay up front for games on mobile.

In terms of being hilariously shifting the balance of power for a consumer product to the big centralized corporate monolith and away from the consumer, I think Stadia deserves all the side-eyeing it received, but I also think that the general incompetence of the product's launch will do far more to discourage further attempts at the same in North America than any amount of rhetorical argument ever will.

North America is once again saved by its own heavily lobbied state of incompetence! Hurray!