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Mosquiton
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"Question for art people" , posted Fri 30 Oct 08:58post reply

So I was looking at Terada's awesome Zelda art and I really have to know something.

What kind of materials are being used here to create these colors/textures?





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nobinobita
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"Re(1):Question for art people" , posted Fri 30 Oct 15:09:post reply

quote:
So I was looking at Terada's awesome Zelda art and I really have to know something.

What kind of materials are being used here to create these colors/textures?



Terada is just using plain old drawing brawn, with ink on paper and copic markers for colors. It looks like watercolor, but I'm almost 100% certain its copics or some other kind of marker that's good for blending.

A few things to take note of in his approach:
-The colors support the drawing. The drawing comes first.
-Colors are expressionistic, more for clarity and mood than rendering. They are rarely literal.
-He doesn't overdo it with the blending. He's not creating smooth gradients, you can still see the brush strokes, which give it a lot more texture and intensity.
-Not everything is equally detailed. For instance, in this picture the red cloth is mostly one tone while the face has some very complex contrasting colors going on:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/historyofhyrule/9267842614/in/album-72157634681811319/. The contrast draws your eye to the face.
-In this image Link is actually very rendered, to provide contrast to the pure white coming out of his sword:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/historyofhyrule/9312153094/in/album-72157634681811319/
-Terada is very good at mixing warm and cool colors to convey skin tones. Notice how the hue contrast only occurs in the skin here, the backgrounds are more flat.
-^This isn't just a simple formula however. Sometimes he has the warm cool contrast in non organic materials. For instance the knights armor is colored like link's skin, yet it still totally reads as armor. Terada goes by instinct, not formula, that's why its so damn hard to learn anything from him:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/historyofhyrule/9311935764/in/album-72157634681811319/

Terada's coloring style from this era is hugely influenced by Moebius (scroll down for a rad Arzach comic):
https://stendekk.wordpress.com/arzach-casy-kiss-comic-tales/

Have you read much stuff by Moebius?
Also, have you read Terada's Monkey King comics? I think they are 2 of the most beautiful comics ever made:
Vol 1
Vol 2

They are a joy to experience. Endlessly re-readable.

Thanks for this opportunity for me to rave bout one of my favorite artists!






www.art-eater.com

[this message was edited by nobinobita on Fri 30 Oct 15:12]

Mosquiton
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"Praise Terada" , posted Fri 30 Oct 18:00:post reply

quote:
So I was looking at Terada's awesome Zelda art and I really have to know something.

What kind of materials are being used here to create these colors/textures?


Terada is just using plain old drawing brawn, with ink on paper and copic markers for colors. It looks like watercolor, but I'm almost 100% certain its copics or some other kind of marker that's good for blending.

A few things to take note of in his approach:
-The colors support the drawing. The drawing comes first.
-Colors are expressionistic, more for clarity and mood than rendering. They are rarely literal.
-He doesn't overdo it with the blending. He's not creating smooth gradients, you can still see the brush strokes, which give it a lot more texture and intensity.
-Not everything is equally detailed. For instance, in this picture the red cloth is mostly one tone while the face has some very complex contrasting colors going on:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/historyofhyrule/9267842614/in/album-72157634681811319/. The contrast draws your eye to the face.
-In this image Link is actually very rendered, to provide contrast to the pure white coming out of his sword:
https://www.fl

-- Message too long, Autoquote has been Snipped --


Nobi, thank you so much for your thoughtful reply. My knowledge of drawing and painting technique is quite limited, so I was thinking, is this watercolor? I could see that it's brushed on but I couldn't stop thinking "How the hell do you do that?" Knowing that Terada must have been in his 20s when these were created just stupifies me. Maybe there is some nostalgia in play here as well, but I absolutely love these illustrations.

It's funny, I think that the first time I had been exposed to Terada's art is a Japanese Wizardry game that Atlus brought to the US in 2001 (Bushin Wizardry Alternative/Tale of the Forsaken Land). The character art struck me as just incredibly cool. I hadn't seen anything quite like it.

I did not take note of who the artist was, or if I did I wasn't able to find out much more about him. Or perhaps I was just busy playing other games. Later on though I got super into the Culdcept series. There was a lot of great card art, but some of the cards seemed to be on a different level. I'm sure I read over many of the artists names, but at this point in time I didn't often take time to look up individual artists.

Years later Culdcept Saga came out. Not many people would consider this game a system seller, but I waited until this game came to buy an Xbox 360. Once again, certain cards really seemed to jump out at me. At this point I knew without looking at the name which cards were illustrated by this Terada guy. So I finally take five minutes to google the name, and lo and behold it's the same guy that did the Wizardry art I loved so much. Then I realize that my goddamn phone wallpaper of Blue Almanac, a game I've never played, is also by Terada!

So it was several years ago I found out that this guy had been my favorite artist for quite some time. I just happened to see these Zelda images again and the art just really speaks to me. It's inspiring as well, since I'm trying to pick up drawing again after neglecting to practice for my entire adult life. I'm limiting myself to pencil and ink now and mainly trying to level-up fundamentals, but maybe I'll get to color someday! After all, it's never to late to be great stop being so shitty and lazy.

To really quickly touch on Moebius, when I started paying attention to Terada I quickly came to understand the substantial Moebius influence. To me it seems almost hilariously obvious in his widely despised Final Fantasy IV illustrations (no-pants Kain was maybe a bit too weird for '90s kids). I actually did read a little bit of The Incal (I'm a Jodorowsky fan), and you just reminded me of the connection between Azrach and Panzer Dragoon. I've only come back to art through videogames, I guess.

Oh. And finally, Monkey King. I was actually close to buying these a while back when someone told me the story really wasn't that great. Rather than dig deeper, I basically used that as an excuse to save myself some money when I didn't have a ton to spare. Maybe I'll pick them up someday!





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[this message was edited by Mosquiton on Fri 30 Oct 18:10]

Mosquiton
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"Re(1):Praise Terada" , posted Fri 30 Oct 18:18post reply

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kofoguz
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"Re(2):Praise Terada" , posted Fri 30 Oct 20:37post reply

quote:
Thread did not update for some reason.

Thanks for this. I also feel the itch in my fingers to draw/paint something. This reminds and encourages me. Thanks as usual.





nobinobita
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"Re(3):Praise Terada" , posted Fri 13 Nov 05:33:post reply

quote:
Thread did not update for some reason.
Thanks for this. I also feel the itch in my fingers to draw/paint something. This reminds and encourages me. Thanks as usual.



I just wanted to share a few annecdotes about our lord and savior Katsuya Terada. I've had the pleasure of meeting him a few times in real life now.

The first time was at his Terra's Black Marker show in Portland. That was like a dream come true for me. I'm not a religious man, so art fills that void in my heart, which is to say meeting Terada was like a Christian meeting Jesus, or at least a Catholic meeting a saint. I was so nervous, but he was incredibly gracious and down to earth and actually took the time to chat a bit. All the while he was drawing.

The show was a great success and I managed to scoop up a few prints too!

About a year after that I was at a house party in San Francisco and HOLY SHIT KATSUYA TERADA SHOWED UP. He is good friends with my friend Sho Murase, a very excellent artist herself. He tends to meet up with her whenever he's in town.

I nervously went up to him to chat. I didn't even know what I was gonna say. When he saw me he said "Hi Richmond!" That's how cool he is. He must have met hundreds of fans that day (a year ago!) but he remembered me!

I actually got to talk with him a good bit that night. The whole time he was sketching on his iPad, finger painting. He'd look around the room, while still fully engaged in conversation and just paint things/people/anything that came to mind. He would paint then erase. Paint and erase. He didn't save anything. This went on for most of the night. I've never seen anything quite like it. A lot of people say they can't stop drawing. Terada sensei.... really ... cannot stop drawing. It would almost call it a compulsion, but it's more like it just comes as naturally to him as breathing.

It was really inspiring. Even in private, in real life, he's still super cool, super chill and super down to earth. Even when a room full of grown men and women are doting on his every word as he shows us cool pictures on his iPad.

Since then I've seen Terada at every show he's done in California. I actually went to his Giant Robot show 2 weekends in a row in LA (took the bus from SF). This time I went with my good buddy Weigy, who is also an excellent artist, and maybe the only person in the world who loves Terada even more than me.

Weigy is a super charming seinen hero kind of guy. We showed up super early to the show and talked to Eric Nakamura, the owner of the gallery for a bit. When he heard that Weigy had actually flown in from Indonesia for the show (and well, also for a friend's wedding :3) he was bowled over. He made sure to introduce us to Terada sensei when he showed up.

Terada sensei was affable as always (my liege knows my name!). Weigy calmly walked up to him and told him in Japanese "You are the biggest influence on my art in my life. Thank you." And Terada called him "Cool." We stayed at that show from opening till close. The time flew by. Just staring at all the artwork for hours on end. By the end of the night we'd asked Terada so many questions that he revoked his "cool" comment and called us "OTAKU!"

Since then he's remembered Weigy every time we pop up as well. I can't say that we're friends or anything, but it's just so great to be able to say ... hey ... I kind of know Katsuya Terada sensei in real life, and he really is an amazing human being. The most talented artist I've ever seen, and he's also just a really good person too.

I don't mean to humble brag (ok maybe just a little). Just wanted to let the world know, man, Katsuya Terada is the coolest dude. He's the real deal. The true Rakugaking.






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[this message was edited by nobinobita on Fri 13 Nov 05:34]