Is Monster Hunter Wii worth? - http://www.mmcafe.com/ Forums


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Nekros
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"Is Monster Hunter Wii worth?" , posted Thu 29 Apr 02:52post reply

I'm wondering about playing MH for Wii.
I'm not a fan of the series, I don't care about multiplayer, never played a MH game.
I'm just curious but want to know if it's a good game to have in my collection or if I can bypass this.

Also, After Burner Climax seems very good and fun from the demo. I love Sega arcade games but I'm not too sure about this one, too. What are the pros/cons of the game?






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Korigama
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"Was wondering if anyone would mention MH here" , posted Thu 29 Apr 04:20:post reply

Monster Hunter Tri is my first time playing the series (I bought the bundle with the CC Pro). So far, it's been quite fun, fairly addictive as well. Gameplay involves hunting a wide variety of monsters and gathering resources, be it plants, mining for minerals/ore, bug catching, or fishing, using those to make new items/equipment and support your village. Close attention needs to be paid to the animations and behavior patterns of the monsters to fight them effectively, and there are a lot of ways to approach it (Sword-and-Shield and Great Sword classes are what you'll initially start out with, with SnS being fairly quick but weaker, while GS is slow yet powerful; Lance, Hammer, Light/Medium/Heavy Bowgun, Switch-Axe, and Long Sword are the other types available). Eventually, you'll be able to take quests which present various challenges (each with a 50-minute time limit), be it something simple like gathering specific varieties of mushrooms or going after much bigger game (essentially the boss monsters of the game). There's quite a bit of depth to the game, but it's introduced at a steady pace.

The closest comparison I could make would be Demon's Souls, but MH3 isn't quite as unforgiving (not as lonely or gloomy either, especially with the community aspects of online play accounted for). Communities are separated by NA/EU/JP regions, however, and Wii Speak can only be used with people already added as friends (no Friend Code system, though), which even then isn't as reliable as a USB keyboard. The CC Pro, however, is worth the investment if you do decide to pick up the game.





[this message was edited by Korigama on Thu 29 Apr 04:22]

Pollyanna
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"Re(1):Was wondering if anyone would mention M" , posted Thu 29 Apr 08:49post reply

I love Monster Hunter, and I think its fan following is well-warranted, but it isn't for everyone. MH3 is definitely an excellent game, and a good game in the series. Although it has less overall content than 2nd G, the advancements it makes in the gameplay department make up for it.

I guess the question is if you're interested in the "joy of the hunt". To me, MH is a game about getting stronger...crawling up from nothing...getting little better each time you play. Of course, you get stronger weapons and armor, but to really enjoy the game, I think you have to enjoy learning new weapons or just "working on your game." It has a last boss and a sort of loose narrative, but it's not a game you get for the sake of finishing.

I wouldn't call it "grindy", as you can finish the game naked if you get good enough and the only experience you get is your own, but there is an element of repetition to it. However, it's not like busy work so much as it's like learning to use a new character in a fighting game. There's a lot of intricacy in recognizing the enemies patterns, placing yourself and carefully aiming your shots. However, if you're not interested in "the hunt" itself, I can see that the game would seem like kind of a chore.

Anyway, I wholeheartedly recommend MH3, but based on what people who don't like it have said, I feel obligated to mention what I did.

I also feel obligated to mention that people who say the game should have a lock-on feature should go to hell.





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KTallguy
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"Re(2):Was wondering if anyone would mention M" , posted Thu 29 Apr 10:25post reply

I bought three iterations of Monster Hunter, and I think it's quite fun, but I dislike having to kill the same monster 10+ times. I like learning the patterns and stuff, but to me the game feels like a grind.

But I still bought it 3 times. It's really a well made game. :)





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nobinobita
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"Re(2):Was wondering if anyone would mention M" , posted Thu 29 Apr 11:08post reply

quote:

I also feel obligated to mention that people who say the game should have a lock-on feature should go to hell.



This pretty much sums it up.

If you're willing to work with the game and learn it's nuances, you'll find it very rewarding. If you just want to hop in and play something familiar and comforting then you're not going to have a good time.





Baines
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"Re(1):Was wondering if anyone would mention M" , posted Thu 29 Apr 15:10post reply

Tri is my first Monster Hunter as well. It is entertaining enough, though frustrating at times.

I'm not going to ask for a lock-on, but it feels like there could be some improvement somewhere. It simply takes more practice than it probably should to manage to hit fairly stationary targets with some of the weapons. At first I thought it was that the game wanted you to have three hands to play it, needing to manage character movement, camera movement, and attacks all at once. Later, I came to believe that it is the character movement itself that is the shortcoming. Your character can be frustratingly unresponsive when you want to make minor facing changes or small movements. As well, the stick difference between stationary and running appears to be fairly small, to the point that I still overshoot people walking around the village. (I'd say that Capcom was aware of the control issue considering that in the village the d-pad is dedicated to switching between who you want to talk to, allowing you to avoid the need for some minor movement and facing corrections.)

If you get your hands on the demo, be aware that that it appears to be designed for existing Monster Hunter players as well. Even though it supports the Classic Controller, it only gives commands for the remote+nunchuck. The demo also consists entirely of two boss fights, with reduced time limits, and no extra explanations. There is a "how-to-play", or at least a basic command guide, inside one of the in-game menus, but I don't think I even found out about that until after I got the full release.





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"Re(3):Was wondering if anyone would mention M" , posted Mon 3 May 05:57post reply

I wish the game didn't force the use of the claw grip for the PSP. Seeing as how MH drives PSP sales, I'm kind of surprised that they haven't already made a specially reworked PSP for MH. Having a free camera is really important to the game, but it's awfully uncomfortable on the PSP.

That said, how is it on the Wii?





Pollyanna
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"Re(4):Was wondering if anyone would mention M" , posted Mon 3 May 06:55post reply

quote:
I wish the game didn't force the use of the claw grip for the PSP. Seeing as how MH drives PSP sales, I'm kind of surprised that they haven't already made a specially reworked PSP for MH. Having a free camera is really important to the game, but it's awfully uncomfortable on the PSP.

That said, how is it on the Wii?



Thanks to the inconvenience of changing the camera on the PSP version, I've gotten used to using the "auto align" so much that I have no idea what good or bad camera is. I can always see what I want to see when I want to see it, so I don't feel like the camera is bad, but like everything else, I guess it's a learning process? Anyway, I use the classic controller on the Wii one, so as far as I can tell, it's slightly less convenient than the PS2 version, but more convenient than the PSP one. I still tend to use auto align most of the time, though.

The one thing that REALLY used to bug me about Monster Hunter (that they've mostly fixed) is the "no no zone." There is an area where the monster can be where you cannot be. If you go there, you exit the map. Sometimes, monsters like to hang out in the no no zone for extended periods of time, driving me into a fury. "JUST GET OUT HERE AND FIGHT ME, YOU USELESS PIECE OF CRAP! GET OUT OF THE FUCKING NO NO ZONE!"

Thankfully, the no no zone seems to shrink in every game.





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Baines
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"Re(5):Was wondering if anyone would mention M" , posted Mon 3 May 08:06post reply

quote:
There is an area where the monster can be where you cannot be. If you go there, you exit the map. Sometimes, monsters like to hang out in the no no zone for extended periods of time, driving me into a fury. "JUST GET OUT HERE AND FIGHT ME, YOU USELESS PIECE OF CRAP! GET OUT OF THE FUCKING NO NO ZONE!"


My gods this is annoying.

If it has gotten better since previous Monster Hunter games, then previous games must have been truly awful. In some areas, I've had monsters go well beyond the area transition border.

How far they can go seems to depend on both the area and the creature. Some creatures try to stay in bounds, while others seem to freely ignore any hint of a border. The Kelbi in Moga Forest (room 3?) love to go far into the cave entrance (to room 7?). I've had Great Jaggi staying entirely behind the transition border in one of the areas in the desert map (room 4 maybe?). And Barroth once seemed to be at least his full body length behind the transition line. Qurupeco has gone beyond the border and done stuff like healed and summoned help, with nothing I could do to stop him.





sfried
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"Re(6):Was wondering if anyone would mention M" , posted Mon 3 May 15:42:post reply

Right now I'm hooked on the game, and it does a better job of pacing/eazing you into the online components. The single player alone actas as a sort of tutorial but also serves as its own game.

I've heard a lot of people compare it to Demon's Souls most likely because of the whole risk/reward aspects of roguelikes also come into player. MH3 is pretty forgiving but you will get walloped if you don't prepare appropriately or take stupid risks.

I can already tell my online experience has been better than that of Phantasy Star Online games (okay, Zero, but it counts). One Quest had us mining for Redstone and my buddies were expecting to encounter the giant Giggi thing, which we did. It took quite a while and many mega poitions but we successfully traped it and went on farming, but upon returning to the same area we had captured it, I found out that it had escaped! My resources were close to dangerously low after the first encounter but all my temmates took one huge gamble to fight it a second time. We were close to not finishing such a simple farming quest since most of us could barely make it back to camp (low stamina).

Yes, online made up for some crazy encounters like that, and plays surprisingly well even with a wireless connection (no lag). Not to mention its free.

Edit: As many mentioned before It's amazing how this game never manages to feel like a grind. From what I understand, only by upgrading your armor/weapons can you increase your defence/offense, and likewise skill sets are equipped via charms. Item craft is definitely one of MH3s strong points.

And yes, this, too, is my first exposure to Monster Hunter. And yes, I got the CCPro Bundle.
quote:

How far they can go seems to depend on both the area and the creature. Some creatures try to stay in bounds, while others seem to freely ignore any hint of a border. The Kelbi in Moga Forest (room 3?) love to go far into the cave entrance (to room 7?). I've had Great Jaggi staying entirely behind the transition border in one of the areas in the desert map (room 4 maybe?). And Barroth once seemed to be at least his full body length behind the transition line. Qurupeco has gone beyond the border and done stuff like healed and summoned help, with nothing I could do to stop him.

There was one instance where I was pushed back to another area by a Great Jaggi's attack. Yeah, the entrances can become targets of annoyances especially during encounters.





[this message was edited by sfried on Mon 3 May 15:55]