Fake English and plausible words - http://www.mmcafe.com/ Forums


Original message (259 Views )


user profileedit/delete message
Platinum Carpet V.I.P- Board Master





"Fake English and plausible words" , posted Mon 14 Dec 08:54post reply

So this addition to Scrabble got made recently, and it's very amusing:
BLABRECS

It uses a really simple Markov chain system (the kind that Mark V Shaney was made with) to derive a general metric for "fake words", where any word that IS found in the real dictionary is considered an invalid word.

But here's a thing I wonder about: to people who are not native English speakers, do they have different conceptions or perceptions about what are likely English words? Say if one person's foundation is built on a Latin-derivative vs another person's whose foundation is built on something entirely else.






Replies:
KTallguy
1574th Post



user profileedit/delete message
PSN: KTallguy
XBL: n/a
Wii: n/a
STM: KTallguy
CFN: n/a
Red Carpet V.I.P- Platinum Member





"Re(1):Fake English and plausible words" , posted Mon 14 Dec 11:25post reply

My brain hurts just thinking about this. Depending on the AI training set it could be very interesting. Imagine if the AI was trained on spelling norms from a hundred years ago?

It kind of reminds me of playing Mojipittan and placing a 'letter' thinking "this has to be a word, right?" Usually it wasn't.





Lord SNK
477th Post



user profileedit/delete message
Gold Customer


"Re(1):Fake English and plausible words" , posted Mon 14 Dec 17:04post reply

quote:

But here's a thing I wonder about: to people who are not native English speakers, do they have different conceptions or perceptions about what are likely English words? Say if one person's foundation is built on a Latin-derivative vs another person's whose foundation is built on something entirely else.



I am not sure if this reply to your question, but years ago someone composed this song.
Wikipedia entry:
"The song is intended to sound to its Italian audience as if it is sung in English spoken with an American accent, designed to be "Bob Dylan-esque"; however, the lyrics are deliberately unintelligible gibberish with the exception of the words 'all right'".





Professor
5831th Post



user profileedit/delete message
MMCafe Owner


"Re(2):Fake English and plausible words" , posted Tue 15 Dec 01:38post reply

quote:
I am not sure if this reply to your question, but years ago someone composed this song.
Wikipedia entry:
"The song is intended to sound to its Italian audience as if it is sung in English spoken with an American accent, designed to be "Bob Dylan-esque"; however, the lyrics are deliberately unintelligible gibberish with the exception of the words 'all right'".



Two things that popped into my mind soon as I saw that link:

1/ What a coincedence, another MMCafe member just happened to Line me about that!
2/ Ok and I'm seeing Youtube placing James Brown next on that list







user profileedit/delete message
PSN: zonepharaoh
XBL: n/a
Wii: n/a
STM: n/a
CFN: zonepharaoh
Platinum Carpet V.I.P- Board Master





"Re(3):Fake English and plausible words" , posted Tue 15 Dec 02:21post reply

Only partially related, but this is a good chance for a public reminder that one of the Cafe's many important unofficial mottos is still "this is true love/tuna with bacon." I actually learned that for the first time from the Professor!





人間はいつも私を驚かせてくれる。不思議なものだな、人間という存在は...


user profileedit/delete message
Platinum Carpet V.I.P- Board Master





"Re(2):Fake English and plausible words" , posted Tue 15 Dec 02:55post reply

quote:

But here's a thing I wonder about: to people who are not native English speakers, do they have different conceptions or perceptions about what are likely English words? Say if one person's foundation is built on a Latin-derivative vs another person's whose foundation is built on something entirely else.


I am not sure if this reply to your question, but years ago someone composed this song.
Wikipedia entry:
"The song is intended to sound to its Italian audience as if it is sung in English spoken with an American accent, designed to be "Bob Dylan-esque"; however, the lyrics are deliberately unintelligible gibberish with the exception of the words 'all right'".



I do know about that song, and I'm glad you brought it up!
It's interesting in that lots of popular songs in the past have had nonsense lyrics that are identifiably nonsense, as opposed to nonsense lyrics that are intended to be unidentifiably nonsense.

More recently, this was made: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yU2wkD-gbzI