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DarkZero
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"OT: CDex Question" , posted Wed 15 Sep 19:37post reply


Alright, now that the other thread informed me about CDex for ripping MP3s, I have an additional question(s):

What settings do you guys use to make ultra-high-quality MP3s for use on your own machines or, in my case, on a 40GB MP3 player? My first test was with the Phantom Brave OST at 320CBR, Stereo, and Normal Quality using the LAME MP3 encoder. When file size isn't an issue, is there any reason to use VBR? Is there any kind of quality bump from using "High (q=2)" quality? And what, exactly, is J-Stereo?

Thanks. Sorry about the OT post.






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Spoon
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"Re(1):OT: CDex Question" , posted Thu 16 Sep 05:13post reply


quote:
What settings do you guys use to make ultra-high-quality MP3s for use on your own machines


Ogg Vorbis is better than mp3, and it's what I try to use. However, not all portable devices support OGG.

quote:
When file size isn't an issue, is there any reason to use VBR?



No.

320kbps may be a bit excessive. Most people, especially on little portable headphones, aren't going to be able to tell the difference between 320kbps and something a lot lot lower, like in the >200kbps range. But you've got 40GB, so whatever.





DarkZero
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"Re(2):OT: CDex Question" , posted Fri 17 Sep 01:03post reply


Thanks for the info, Spoon. Because the file size doesn't matter, I'm probably going to stick with 320kbps. It just doesn't create a very noticeable difference, but I'd rather have the highest quality copy I can so that I can scale it down from there. And yes, if my MP3 player accepted Ogg Vorbis files, I'd be using that, too. The best audio files I have on my computer are my collection of Initial D CDs encoded in Ogg Vorbis. I actually have to find something to rip them into MP3s so I can put them in my MP3 player, but that shouldn't be too hard.

Does anyone have an answer about that J-Stereo thing, though? I'm guessing it's Joint Stereo, because I've noticed that most of my best MP3s use Joint Stereo, but I'm not sure of what it is and whether or not I should use it on all kinds of audio files (vocal, instrumental, guitar, violin, etc.).